Dog Laws you need to be aware of.

Dogs

 

Dogs have increasingly become a part of West Australian (WA) families with over 50% now owning a dog! These loyal companions and friends become our responsibility – we care for them, feed them and exercise them – and it is also important to keep up to date with new legislations.

 

The Dog Act 1976 is administered and enforced by local governments within their respective districts. The Act addresses the control and registration of dogs, the ownership and keeping of dogs and the obligations and rights of dog owners. Part of our responsibility is to follow the rules that are in place to benefit everyone within the WA community. We aim to educate visitors to our website on the obligations under state law. Please note that local laws may apply - please contact your local council.

 

Micro chipping

Changes introduced in November 2013 require that all dogs must be micro chipped. This must be done prior to your pet going to a new home and includes young puppies as well. All dangerous dogs, which includes restricted breeds and commercial security dogs must be micro chipped. Micro chipping enables lost dogs to be reunited with their owners and it is important to keep the chip details up-to-date which can be done online. Micro chipping is also proof of ownership, so make sure you update those details!

 

Dangerous Dogs

Laws around dangerous dogs apply in WA and these were introduced with the aim of increasing the safety of the community and as responsible dog owners it it our duty to follow them. Under the Dog Regulations 2013 and the Dog Act 1976 a dangerous dog means a dog that is:

1. A dangerous dog (restricted breed) or,

2. A dangerous dog (declared) or

3. A commercial security dog

 

Some of the obligations owners must comply with include:

1. A collar with red and yellow diagonal strips (all colours must be fluorescent)

2. Be contained in an enclosure that meets specific requirements

3. Warning signs

4. Muzzled when not enclosed

 

Please refer to the attached fact sheet for the full obligations. Please note that penalties can range from $400 to a maximum of $10,000. 

 

Dog registration

All dogs 3 months old must be registered with their local government. Please contact your local government for more information – most registration forms are available on their websites. Penalty for non registration is $200.

Registration tags

Once you register your dog you will be given a registration tag by your council. The registration tag shows that your dog is registered and is another way of reuniting lost dogs with their owners. This must be attached to their collar, the penalty for not wearing a valid registration tag is $200.

 

Barking

Part of a dogs nature is to bark and whilst we consider this to be normal, excessive or continual barking may be a nuisance to others. If your dog is barking it is important to work out why the dog is barking before the problem can be solved. Are they barking at something or do they require further exercise and/or mental stimulation? If your neighbour's dog is barking, contact them and let them know what is happening - chances are they aren't even aware! Dog barking can be escalated within your local council however if nothing changes. 

 

Wandering

Aside from the risks to the dog (injury/accidents) the penalty for a wandering dog ranges from $200 to $5000. Please use a leash at all times and secure your properties fencing to prevent your dog from wandering.

 

Dog droppings

Most local councils provide bags and bins at local reserves and most have local laws which require dog owners to adequately remove and dispose of the matter. Please respect our environment and other users of the recreational spaces.... There's nothing worse then having fun times with your pets at a local park and stepping in poo! Or worse - your pet rolling in it!

Our beautiful website images are courtesy of Houndstooth Studio and Shutter Paws.

 

Site terms and conditions.

WA Pet Project is a Perth based cat and dog rescue focused on improving the lives of pets and their humans. 

© 2016  by Alexie Green.